• From Jekyll to Hugo

    It is done. This site is now powered by Hugo instead of Jekyll. It took me a full week’s worth of early mornings to achieve, but the results are great… internally, that is, because as a reader you should notice no changes other than minor style tweaks. Performance differences As of today, this site hosts 711 posts totaling 3.4MB of text. The style sheet is based on Bootstrap and is built from scratch using SASS.

  • Looking to replace Jekyll

    Back in May 2015, I was lured to Medium by its simplicity and growing community, which resulted in me posting a bunch of articles there and enjoying every moment of it. But, eventually, I noticed that I was losing control of my content. So a year later, my experiments to create static homepage resulted in me moving from Blogger and Medium to a Jekyll-managed site. Almost two years have passed since that migration and I can only count 7 miserable new posts. This ridiculously-low number, unfortunately, doesn’t track my willingness to write—but the friction to posting has become so high that I fear composing new essays.

  • Fighting execs via sandboxfs on macOS

    Since the announcement of sandboxfs a few weeks ago, I've been stabilizing its integration with Bazel as a new sandboxing technique. As part of this work, I encountered issues when macOS was immediately killing signed binaries executed through the sandbox. Read on for the long troubleshooting process and the surprising trivial solution.

  • Introducing sandboxfs

    sandboxfs is a FUSE-based file system that exposes an arbitrary view of the host’s file system under the mount point, and offers access controls that differ from those of the host. You can think of sandboxfs as an advanced version of bindfs (or mount --bind or mount_null(8) depending on your system) in which you can combine and nest directories under an arbitrary layout. The primary use case for this project is to provide a better file system sandboxing technique for the Bazel build system.

  • Introducing sourcachefs

    Announcing the launch of sourcachefs, a FUSE-based persistent caching layer.

  • Easy pkgsrc on macOS with pkg_comp 2.0

    This is a tutorial to guide you through the shiny new pkg_comp 2.0 on macOS using the macOS-specific self-installer. Goals: to use pkg_comp 2.0 to build a binary repository of all the packages you are interested in; to keep the repository fresh on a daily basis; and to use that repository with pkgin to maintain your macOS system up-to-date and secure.

  • Keeping NetBSD up-to-date with pkg_comp 2.0

    This is a tutorial to guide you through the shiny new pkg_comp 2.0 on NetBSD. Goals: to use pkg_comp 2.0 to build a binary repository of all the packages you are interested in; to keep the repository fresh on a daily basis; and to use that repository with pkgin to maintain your NetBSD system up-to-date and secure.